3 March, 2024

Haggis is a traditional Scottish dish commonly served at Burns Suppers and on festive occasions. This meat-free version is packed with flavour as well as plenty of vegetables and nuts which are great sources of fibre. Nuts and beans are also great sources of protein and carrots contain high levels of carotenoids.

Serves:

Preparation time: 60 minutes 

If you can, use organic ingredients for this recipe. Although we are unsure whether eating organic food reduces breast cancer risk, organic food contains less pesticide residue. We know that certain pesticides are linked to breast cancer risk, so we recommend eating organic food whenever possible. Read more on pesticides here.

Ingredients:  

Haggis

1 onion

3-4 medium chestnut mushrooms

1 medium carrots (approx. 125g)

1 400g kidney beans (in glass jar) drained and washed

75g dried red lentils

75g oats

45g peanuts

30g hazelnuts

1 tbsp vegetable oil

2 tbsp marmite

1 tbsp lemon juice

1 tbsp light soy sauce

225ml vegetable stock

1 tsp dried rosemary

1 tsp ground nutmeg

½ tsp smoked paprika

1 tsp cinnamon or allspice

1 tbsp ground black pepper – or more if you like it spicy

¼ tsp sea sat

Neeps

1 large swede (approx. 800g)

1 tbsp plant-based butter or olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Tatties

700g potatoes

75ml oat milk

1 tbsp plant-based butter or olive oil

1 tbsp wholegrain mustard

Salt and pepper to taste

Equipment:

Large pan

Grater

Masher

Baking tray

Instructions

  • Begin by peeling and dicing the onion, and then grate the carrots and finely chop or grate the mushrooms. After draining the kidney beans, mash them well in a bowl. Proceed to roughly chop or blitz the nuts; if you have a food processor, you can blitz the carrots, mushrooms, kidney beans, and nuts together.
  • Peel the potatoes and swede. Dice the potatoes and swede into 1-inch pieces.
  • Next, peel the potatoes and swede, and then dice them into 1-inch pieces. In a large saucepan, heat the oil, and fry the onions until they are soft and translucent.
  • Add the lentils and stock, bring to the boil then cover and simmer for about 14-16 minutes until the lentils are soft but not completely mushy and most of the water has been absorbed. Once the lentils are soft, add the oats, 1 tbsp water and a good load of pepper, stir through and cook for 2-3 minutes.
  • Add the nuts, carrot, mushrooms, kidney beans, marmite, lemon juice, soy sauce, herbs and spices plus a pinch of salt depending on saltiness of stock, marmite and soy sauce.
  • Stir for 5 mins whilst it thickens then taste – it should be a thick doughy porridge consistency and taste rich and peppery, adjust season if required. Turn off the heat and leave to sit.
  • Spread the haggis out on a greased baking tray and bake for 25-30 minutes until crisp on the top. Meanwhile, cook the neeps and tatties (swede and potatoes).
  • Boil water in two separate pans. Put the swede in one pan and the tatties in the other and cook for 12-15 minutes until the neeps and tatties are tender.
  • Drain the potatoes and retain about 2 tbsp of the potato water with the potatoes in the pan. Following that, add the milk, butter/oil, mustard, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Mash until smooth.
  •  Drain and return to the pan, then stir through the butter/oil and season with salt and pepper. Mash until smooth.
  • Serve 1-2 scoopfuls of each of the haggis, neeps and tatties.

Why this is good for you  

Lentils and kidney beans are rich in fibre. A diet high in fibre is associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer.

There is evidence that processed meat slightly increases breast cancer risk. This recipe replaces red meat with plant-based alternatives, including beans, nuts and vegetables, which may help reduce the risk of breast cancer.

Enjoyed this haggis, neeps and tatties recipe and are craving more recipes like this? Breast Cancer UK’s brand new recipe e-book Download (for free) ‘Organic Flavours’ and Sareta Puri’s website have got you covered! For more amazing recipes by Sareta Puri head over to her website. What are you waiting for? Get cooking. 



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